Muskogee County

County Seat: Muskogee, Oklahoma 74401

Muskogee County was named for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

 

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Bake Oven
This brick oven was constructed with the new bakery erected at Fort Gibson about 1863 to supply the garrison with fresh bread. **
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Battle of Honey Springs
Site 2 mi. east where on July 17, 1863, Gen. J. G. Blunt with Union force of 3,000 men attacked a Confederate force under Gen. D. H. Cooper, encamped on Elk Creek Superior arms and equipment forced the Confederates to withdraw suffering heavy losses. Oklahoma Historical Society and State Highwa ...
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Cherokee National Cemetery
Before the Civil War, the Cherokees designated the cemetery as a national cemetery. The Cherokee Nation maintained the cemetery until 1906 when it was transferred to the town of Fort Gibson. Cherokee Principal Chief William P. Ross and other tribal leaders are buried here. **
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First Commercial Long Distance Telephone Line in Oklahoma
Telephones in 1886 The first commercial long distance telephone line in Oklahoma was placed in service here in 1886. It connected Fort Gibson with Tahlequah and Muskogee. The line was built by a company formed by a group of Cherokees, namely: L.B. Bell, J.S. Stapler, J.B. Stapler, C. ...
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Fort Davis
Brigadier General Albert Pike established this frontier post in November of 1861 to house Confederate forces. It was named for Confederate President Jefferson Davis who had served in present-day Oklahoma in his army career. Union forces completely destroyed the heavily fortified post two days a ...
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Fort Gibson
Fort Gibson has a long and colorful history. The first post was erected by Colonel Matthew Arbuckle in 1824 and named for the head of the army's commissary department. At the time, it was the westernmost fort built by the military to guard the western frontier. **
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John Martin's Grave
Here lies buried John Martin, a Cherokee indian, born October 20, 1781. He was first chief justice of the first supreme court established in the Cherokee nation. He died October 17, 1840. Erected by the Oklahoma Planning and Resources board 1938.
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La Harpe’s Council
First peace council and alliance between a European government and Oklahoma Indian tribes occurred here in 1719 when French explorer Bernard de la Harpe explored the area. **
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Powder Magazine
Erected to provide storage space for the gunpowder and ammunition used by the troops stationed at the post, this building was constructed about 1842. **
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Red Bird
This is one of thirteen all-black towns, out of more than 50 that once existed, remaining in Oklahoma. While Tullahassee is reportedly the oldest, most were established between 1889 and 1907 as blacks sought security and control of their own destiny in a segregated world. Most of the towns bega ...
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State's Earliest Oil Refinery
STATE'S EARLIEST OIL REFINERY Muskogee Oil Refining Company, organized in March, 1905, built a "finishing plant" near this site in November, 1905. It soon was producing lamp kerosene, lubricating oil and industrial fuel -- the beginning of oil refining in Oklahoma, a leading industry today. ...
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Thomas-Foreman Home
Residence was built by John R. Thomas, a federal judge and former congressman from Illinois. He was known as the father of the United States Navy for his congressional work to increase the size of the American navy. His daughter, Carolyn Thomas, married his law partner, Grant Foreman, and they ...
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Tullahassee
Tullahassee, a Creek word meaning "old town," now occupies the site of Tullahassee Mission, established in the Creek Nation in 1850 by Reverend Robert M. Loughridge under the auspices of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions. After the mission burned and was abandoned, Creek freedmen moved ...
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Union Agency
Now housing the Five Civilized Tribes Museum, this original Union Agency building was constructed in 1875 by the federal government to oversee the affairs of the Five Civilized Tribes. Cornerstone was laid by members of the Masonic Lodge, believed to be the first Masonic cornerstone laying in O ...
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USS Batfish / War Memorial Park and Museum
Muskogee War Memorial and home of the USS Batfish.
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Webbers Falls
Western Cherokee Chief Walter Webber established a trading post here in 1829. The falls on the Arkansas were reportedly six feet high in 1806, sufficient to block travel for river steamers. The village of Webbers Falls was burned by federal troops in the Civil War in April 1863. **