Choctaw County

County Seat: Hugo, Oklahoma 74743

Choctaw County's name is derived from Chahta, the mythical founder of the Choctaw people.

 

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Chief's Old House
Built by the Federal government in 1832 under its treaty obligations with the Choctaw Nation, this house was once the home of the famous Choctaw District Chief Thomas LeFlore. Constructed by government contract workmen from Fort Towson using the $10,000 provided by the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit ...
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Choctaw Chief's House
Planned by Greenwood LeFlore, the structure was built for the chief of this district of the Choctaw Nation under the provisions of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek of 1830. Thomas LeFlore, who was elected chief in 1834, was the first resident of the house. It is the oldest surviving structure ...
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Doaksville
Growing around Josiah Doak's store, established in the late 1830s, the town became the commercial center of the region. On November 11, 1847, the name of the nearby post office at Fort Towson was changed to Doaksville. None of the original structures are standing today. It was near here that Br ...
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Dorothy Jean Orton
Dorthy Jane Orton was the primer mover in urging the restoration of old Fort Towson due to her untiring efforts. Her home community and the entire state became aware of the importance of preserving Fort Towson as a part of Oklahoma's Historic Heritage. She was born on January 7, 1915, at Fo ...
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Fort Towson
Established May, 1824, under command of Col. Matthew Arbuckle to guard this region on Spanish border. Headquarters of Gen. S.B. Maxey, U.S. Army; abandoned at close of Civil War. In the vicinity, Doaksville was important trading center and one time capitol of Choctaw Nation, George Hudson, ...
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Fort Towson Landing
The Fort Townson Landing was south of here on the banks for the Red River also know as the public landing from 1824 to 1854 it served as a receiving point for soldiers and supplies delivered by keelboats and steamboats Traders at the Choctaw settlement of Doaksville and local planters revei ...
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Goodland Mission
Begun 1848 by Rev. John Lathrop of American Bd. of Foreign Miss. Rev. O. P. Start, Supt. (1850), built first church. Mrs. Stark opened first school there. Others in the service through 10 years included W. J. B. Lloyd, J. P. Gibbons, Bella M. Gibbons, Silas Bacon, Mr. and Mrs. B McCann, Ebeneze ...
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Goodwater Choctaw Mission
Site about 6 miles south. Mission was opened in 1837, by Rev. Ebenezer Hotchkins, under auspices of Foreign Missions, Kunsha Sem. for girls was located there, 1842, by the Choctaw Council, through influence of Israel Folsom, noted Choctaw.*
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Pine Ridge Mission
The Presbyterian minister Reverend Cyrus Kingsbury established the Pine Ridge Mission in 1836. The Choctaw Council established a school for girls, Chuahla Female Seminary, at the mission in 1842, which Kingsbury supervised. The school was closed during the Civil War.
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Rose Hill
One time noted plantation home of Col. Robert M. Jones, wealthiest Choctaw, owner of 500 slaves. A Southern leader, he served as delegate from Choctaw Nation to the Confederate Congress at Richmond, Va. Baptist Mission of "Providence" nearby, closed about 1843, was acquired by Jones and conver ...
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Spencer Academy
A noted school for boys, Spencer Academy was established by the Choctaw Nation in 1841 and named for Secretary of War John C. Spencer. Students who became Choctaw leaders included Allen Wright, Jackson McCurtain, and Jefferson Gardner. Two elderly black slaves, Uncle Wallace and his wife, Aunt ...
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Stand Waite Surrender
Confederate Brigadier General Stand Watie commanded all Southern troops in the Department of Indian Territory at the close of the Civil War. Although most of the troops had already been sent home, Watie formally surrendered here on June 23, 1865-the last Confederate general to lay down his arms.*